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%. almost 2%. the decision that we made, with technology companies, by inviting twitter to stay in mid market, as they grow from 450 employees, to over 2000. they signal that the beginning of their lease, they would release about 250,000 square feet of the building, but they are exceeding that already. by june of next year, they will have 1000 people moving from their folsom street office to market street. that is what we were wishing would happen. what people do not understand, when they see the twitter deal, it was not so much the twittered deal as it was a mid-american revitalization effort by us. that is what we wanted to do. we wanted to use the ttwitter deal to signal the revitalization of the corridor. and it worked. i'm with another company that had decided to relocate in the same building, but what was happening across the street at a lot of people did not know. on 10th and market, there is a project that has been a hole in the ground for over three years, crescent heights. they did not start that project, about 500 units, because there investors got shaky over the last couple
career, -- i'm new to cable. -- you are the yo chief technology officer at -- >> correct. >> there in the -- my role at hp, we focused a lot on what the people do with the technology in their homes and in their hands and on their desk. being able to look at that from end to end. an innovator by back and. it is about coming up with those great i years and translating those two have high impacts. >> what are some products that you are excited about? >> we have been looking at all of the programs that we have currently running. we narrowed it down to key focus areas. one is the technology. commercially, we have been upwards of megabits. we will see 300. we announced work on 3.1 which is technologies out of cable lab that will allow cable operators to offer you 10 gig. you will start seeing that as we get those technologies refined. we are seeing that progression. better technologies on the network side. giving you more capacity to watch those videos and communicate with friends and all kinds of things. >> is that going to take new hardware and wires in the home? >> no. the c
at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanford and lawrence berkeley. that is an indication we are getting smart people like her out to california to start companies like hers. 15 employees in 2008. it is interesting, we talk about cloud computing and these technology companies, but she takes electronic waste that is rich in carbon and recycles that into oil for plastics and a variety of other things. i wish i had more time to talk to you and get to know you because i am sure there's a
that we have read, that technology and the enhanced use of auto maition and technology have been a recurring theme for the department of building and inspection and i didn't see any emphasis and there was no mention of that in terms of the budget or at least not with any emphasis, i also note having red last year's grand jury report that the city has a very, very poor track record of implementing technology and yet, it seems to have been established that you know, hand held devices in the field, and better coordination of records from different departments that there are a wide variety of ways that technology could improve the efficiency of the staff, and the customer service, if you will. so i wondered, where that is in the budget, and what safe guards that the technology could be properly implemented. >> thank you. >> hi, again, robert, i was just wondering about the comments of the open notices of violation. and my question is how are the down stream effects not relevant? the permits that are applied for the inspection fees, the reinspection fees? i mean, if you look at the ja
front of technology. but to be really well educated and a specialist in any one of those things, requires a very deep immersion, deep immersion software or bioinfomatics or the various underlying sciences. and i wish i had had a better formal scientific education when i was younger. that more than anything would have helped me, i think. >> rose: here's you what said, my undergraduate degree was in history. i wish i would have been smart enough to excel in math, fitics-- physics or biology because the voyagers and adventurers come from there. >> that's where they start from. and yes, i don't quarrel with any part of that sentiment. i think those are today's voyagers. and they start off with a grounding in those particular sciences. >> rose: and do the business school grads become transactional people and go to wall street and go to financial institutions? >> it's obviously, charlie, unfair to paint a broad-brush here. and there's some very talented people who come out of the business schools. but-- and who join these companies. and a very vital parts of helping the companies get
guess america is very rich in shale. >> we are very rich in shale and we're very rich in technology to tap into that shale. >> we're not using it. >> we have -- we're using it in larger and larger ams. what's happened in the united states is we have had a shale gas revolution already with more potential. the technology is good. environmental standards are very high because the industry is making a major effort to ensure that there are no major mistakes that cause problems. so this will do two things. it creates a lot of jobs in this industry but it also lowers the cost of chemicals, it low weeere cost of gas, gasses backing out coal, backing out natural gas that we otherwise would import and otherwise increasing production of petroleum. we used to be dependent on imports of 60 percent of our petroleum and now 40%. potentially an exporter of natural gas, government regulations have to be worked out but we could be exporting natural gas if the right decisions are made to do that. the ams aamounts will obviously depend on certain decisions. no one would have imagined this ten years ago
] >> in a few moments, yahoo! ceo marissa mayer on the future of technology. and in a half hour, an inquiry on the security on the korean peninsula. >>> secretary of state john kerry will be at the university of virginia for what's being described as his first major speech since being confirmed. that's at 11 a.m. eastern. and then at 12:30, the assistant secretary of state for conflict resolution and stabilization speaks at the council on foreign relations about iraq and afghanistan. >> the communism of china basically is communism in name only these days, and it preserved the power of the members of the communist party. but they basically threw most ideology aside when saw ping opened the country up, and it's now become a capitalist haven. they talk at great length at these party congresses, but it's all about preserving the party's power economically as the country continues to grow because they threw aside most vestiges of communism a long time ago. in north korea it's all about preserving the power of the military and the kim dynasty, as you have there. and, again, it's, out really has
such as the internet, fiber optics and other technologies. four of the winners later won the nobel prize. >>> when it comes to getting rid of terrorists japanese manufacturers want i want as they can sell more products overseas but farmers and others in the agricultural business are against the idea mean being exposed to stiff competon. prime minister abe is facing tough decisions in his upcoming trade talks. ron madison is here with the details on that. >> you're talking about the ttp. at least a couple of other prers in the prior administration had to deal with it. now prime minister shinzo abe has to take it up. he'll decide whether the japan will join the free trade deal. that decision will be made before the summer. abe told a diet committee on wednesday that what matters is whether the u.s.-led tpp talks are based on the pre-condition altar arrives will be removed without exception. the tpp is expected to be one of the main issues when abe meets president obama later this week. >> translator: at the meeting i will not mention individual items to exclude from the tariff ban. i will confirm wh
a cover story today on the republicans and their problem with technology and stuart, this quote caught my eye "romney's senior strategist stuart stevens, may well be remembered by historians as the last guy to run a presidential campaign who never tweeted." >> really made -- if i had tweeted in this campaign this whole discussion we've been having about the second amendment would be replaced about the first amendment and whether it should apply to tweeting. listen i don't think that it would be a great mistake if we felt that technology in itself is going to save the republican party. technology is something to a large degree you can go out and purchase and if we think there's an off the shelf solution that you can with the republican party it's wrong. you know, we've had a lot of chance since the campaign to spend time with the obama folks and sometimes they had better technology. some cases we have better technologiment we don't have 140 character problem in the republican party. we have a larger problem that we have to look at and be patient about it. and trying to think that there's o
, the objects addressed in the second amendment inherently evolve with technology. guns today are exceptionally different from guns a hundred years ago, let alone guns at the time of the framing. and in light of the second amendment's peculiarly close relationship with technology, it would make even less sense to be bound solely by history. in his prepared statement, mr. cooper quoted from i think it was chicago v. mcdonald where the court said that the second amendment is like the other amendments. it's subject to a consideration of competing constitutional claims like claims to life, liberty, security and then here's the language, it's knotts to be singed -- it's not to be singled out for special treatment. and i think what mr. cooper is doing is he's elevating the second amendment above all of the other values. of course the court doesn't think that the second amendment should be subject to reevaluation and rejiggering and rebalancing just because we live in the 21st century. but he, as all of the examples that you, i think, carefully enumerated, is clearly open to the idea that a whole rang
as the world changes for his use of technology and empowering social change. he is working on a biography of leonard freed. let us welcome these distinguished guests and one how leonard freed's images of the historic march in august 1963 changed the ongoing worldwide struggle for civil rights. [applause] >> "this is the day," how did this book it started? i say, it was president obama in his first term who said, i am nearer because you all marched. 50 years ago we did, what did i think america was? it was all things to me. my husband home country, my new jewish family, robert and benjamin, leonards cousins, and lots of americans. we came here from amsterdam to photograph the blessed people. i have no photo of myself, of our seven-month stay in america but pictures of her four year old daughter, her grandparents and cousins. leonard was very -- he needed all film for his project. nothing but races he said. i wish i had a picture of myself and of leonard at the march on washington. i only had my eyes. and these eyes looked and looked and looked, i would say, all these faces, and when letter
developments in cash-transfer technology. the ipo priced at 16 dollars a share, above the expected 13- to 15-dollar range. xoom trades under its name, ticker symbol "x-o-o-m," on the nasdaq. the chips are down for donald trump's atlantic city casino. trump plaza was recently sold to a california company for $20 million. it's the lowest price ever paid for a casino in the jersey gambling mecca. reports say trump entertianment resorts is $270 million dollars in debt. the donald has a 10% stake in the company. in our cover story, makers of electric and hybrid vehicles got a boost from one of their own, a solar energy systems ceo who organized a road rally in chicago. more than a dozen alternative fuel cars and one produce truck re-enacted an 1895 road rally through chicago and north suburban evanston - a rally inspired by david funcheon, whose company builds solar thermal electric systems. "if i can't get people behind alternative energy cars, i can't get them interested in solar thermal systems." the rally, just 50 miles - barely into downtown chicago's closest northern suburb, was more parade
: in terms of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water
. .. the new technology would be the answer, but 12 years ago technology had not yet caught up at the station. last year he gave thanks to the production team that pushed themselves to deliver some thing never been done before, a marvelous movie was created. this is another example of why we go to the movies to be astonished into dream as well. it was all of this technology, innovation and creativity, ticket price to consumers has remained remarkably stable over many, many of us, roughly dollars. other than listening to music, watching free tv programming, the most affordable, accessible entertainment is watching a picture inside the state-of-the-art theater. that's why they've told theaters continue to try were people than all theme parks and major sporting event combine. it has never been a better time to be a consumer of movies and television. because it is not up to more people in workplaces want to watch them more times across multiple platforms, the film and television industries innovating to meet that demand. today's movies and television shows can be viewed in theaters on big screens
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show u
specialeesed technology and training exemplified the advantages the developed world offered haiti. sensitive microphones, heat-seeking devices and rescue dogs. journalists enshourd audiences would not miss a single survivor being pulled from the rubble. a successful rescue is like an earthquake in reverse. life. the tone of the reporting took on a religious tinge. quote, a new york rescue squad pulled two miracles from the rubble of haiti, led the new york daily is in, at california governor arnold schwarzenegger rashed, quote, many of us were able to watch the california rescuers live on television performing all of these miracles. the first u.s. team to reach haiti was dispatched to u.n. head quarterback and pulled out a bodyguard with minor injuries. ban ki-moon called it a small miracle. an enormous effort targeted the collapsed hotel mt. which had some 200 people inside, mostly foreigners, when it fell. general keene, the head of the u.s. military response would boast, quote, the hotel montana had six teams alone because of the number of people trapped there. the places were ordinary ha
. that is a question that authorities are wrestling with, while playing catch up with this technology. we look at the complicated question of what to do with drones. >> the skies across america could soon be welcoming more drones. the faa is seeking proposals from cities, states and universities to create six test sites for unmanned aircraft systems. the sites will allow them to develop safety standards that will allow drones to be fully integrated into the national air space by 2015. the drone industry said they make good economic sense. in the next three years after the faa figured out integration, we could see 70,000 jobs be created in the industry. >> the coast guard uses drones for surveillance on ice sheets in alaska and others were used during a border dispute. they will be monitoring pipelines by energy companies and by familiarers to monitor crops. new uses will need new rules to protect privacy. >> we do not want drones to be eyes in the sky spying on us. we need controls so that drones are only used when we have -- we believe a crime is happening or we are trying to do something par
an advantage over people in earlier generations. they have access to modern technology. they have social networking. they have smart phones. they have the internet and the use of technology then allows them to access questionnaires about their substance use, to participate in social networking support groups, and to link up with electronic health records or their counselors and to have online counseling if they're reluctant to go to face-to-face counseling. so technology offers a great deal of promise that young people are more comfortable with and use on a regular basis. so this is a revolutionary time for our youth and we hope to take advantage of the technological advances to promote recovery. [music playing] where's mom? did she forget me? i wonder what happened to her. what if i get left here? drugs and alcohol may make you forget your problems for a moment, but that's not all you forget. my mother worked hard to be in recovery and i love her for that. for drug and alcohol treatment for you or someone you love, call 1-800-662-help. brought to you by the u.s. department of health and
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
this level of technology, high performance equipment is in hot demand in south korea, so we would like to introduce it. >> translator: people are getting more nervous, not just in japan but also in china and south korea. a number of inquiries we're getting from those countries have been increasing. >> reporter: official from the japanese environment ministry are working on early warning system. they collect data from around the country every warning and issue warnings if necessary. >> translator: the public's concern is growing. the ministry will deal with the issue properly. >> reporter: ministry officials plan to introduce guidelines by the end of the month to try to prevent any related health problems. they say they want to be prepared for whatever comes. >>> japan posted a record trade deficit with china, due to strained bilateral relations and a slowing economy. it is just about double the amount of 2011 the shortfall topped the previous record set in 2005. exports to china amounted to $145 billion, down more than 10% from the previous year. the first drop in three years, falling
to develop radiation. >> new things have to be sent into space. >> a lot of new things. the technology from that then goes out and stimulate the world economy like apollo and early space programs stimulated the economy of the world. i got an iphone on my hip that has 2000 times the memory of an apollo computer. can you imagine? the space station guys, they have texts, skype or something up there. and they're all on their laptops. it boggles your mind what is going on there technologically. >> today you could probably tweet what is going on on your flight. on your first and only flight, on the way back to earth, you got to do spacewalk. >> it was totally different. a different experience. as i described being on the moon, it contrasts the gray lunar surface with the blackness of space. people ask me what does the earth like from the moon? i said i cannot tell you because i landed in the center of the moon which took the earth directly overhead. in an apollo space suit, it is like being in a fishbowl. you move your head but the helmut does not move. so i did not get to see the earth very much
that historically has suffered from maybe the worst website and some of the worst technology in government. and over the last few years we have worked really hard to improve that park user's experience through the use of technology. and i want to start out before we talk a little about the app saying a if you thank yous. i really want to thank mayor lee to his incredible commitment to technology and frankly the recreation and park department. i want to thank supervisor chiu who has been a leader both in the parks world and in the technology world. sf city has really been a driving force behind helping government think about new ways, new and improved ways maybe for some of you they're old ways now. but new and improved ways for government to reach users of our programs and services. and i want to say the last special thank you to the folks from apple-liscious. this thing is awesome. this past year, the trust for public land which is a national parks organization determined that san francisco, which has 4,000 acres of open space and over 220 parks, over 15% of the city's land is open space. the trust
, but technology used by millions of you worldwide. if you do a service provider like comcast or sprint in many cases you're able to send your text messages like video chat all thanks in part to genband software and hardware. they announce a very important partnership with samsung. charles vogt is the ceo and president. congratulations, what is this relationship with samsung? >> we're taking genband voice over ip technology and putting it on a tablet. and changing the whole way you and i communicate in the office, so imagine creating the ultimate mobile office for everything you can do in the office, you can take on the go. very exciting. liz: samsung can pick and choose. what did you offer them? >> what was significant was two things. genband has been developing technologies, selling it to the carriers for years, sweetheart and the key technology we have been deploying that now we are putting into the mobile world. so taking our customers and their mobile technology is a perfect marriage. liz: you have married a lot of companies. helping them to grow and come together, so much so investors lov
and others and we all agree that technology, expediting our kids earlier with the expectation for college and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success not
to spinal injuries. plus? >> the latest warning from technology experts on mobile devices. >> i love how that is the universal i just made a free throw shot. >> whether moving our way, there is still a chance for ice tomorrow. right now it is 32 degrees to the airport, 37 degrees downtown. beautiful blue skies, >> in medical alerts, some promising results in research for spinal injuries. lab rats that were once paralyzed are walking and running again because of ongoing research in switzerland. some of the animals started moving voluntarily after a few weeks of therapy. trials of human patients are expected to begin within the next two years. flu activity continues to decline across the country. 31 states were reporting widespread activity as of friday, down from 38 the week before. western and northeastern states are still experiencing high levels of the flu. more than half the people that need to be hospitalized because of the flu are older than 50. dozens of people took part in a laughter yoga therapy session in venezuela this weekend. participants are encouraged to laugh and watch oth
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patterns and how they may affect you. and learn how technology is changing the world of forecasting. ♪ yeeeowwww! ♪ hot mess hot mess hot mess ♪ ♪ you're a hot kind of love you set me on fire ♪ ♪ you spice up my night feed my every desire ♪ jack's one hit wonder is now a burger. the hot mess is loaded with spicy jalapeños, onion rings and gooey pepper jack cheese. ♪ you're a - a hot mess and that's how i met your mom. ♪ hot mess >>> san francisco bay area is highly vulnerable to natural hazards like earthquakes, wildfires and severe weather. so we have created one place for you to find all the resources and tips you need to be prepared. visit norcal and learn how you can keep you and your family safe. >> climate changes seems to have come upon us so suddenly, even though they were telling us 30 years and 40 years ago we could expect the weather conditions we have seen globally in the last five to ten years. it was five years ago because what human beings were putting in the atmosphere we could expect these climb changes. we are seeing seeing m
and has a federal back bone and it is typically used to foster new anti-terrorism technology and someone has designed something that they think will preclude a terrorist from being successful, it is in the building for the facilities like the transit center to have the opportunity to be designated and certified as a safety act facility. we are on the bleeding edge, no. we are on the leading edge, yes. the executive director charged the design team and the consultant team to follow best practice and to make sure that this facility was designed in a way that was similar to other significant assets. these are a list of other entitis that have gone about filing for safety acts, we are not the first. but you are certainly on a list with the major players. this was a little bit more information. if you want to obtain safety act designation, there are a bunch of things that you have to do. this is a listing of the enhancements in safety and security that are expected when you are reviewed for safety act designation and certification. i will go through these in more detail. these are the investm
the technology breakthroughs have international capacity. i think that is why we need a regional approach. that is why i am here, to make sure we protect our hetch hetchy water system. that creates the standard of living that we want, that keeps people here. that is why we have regional transport systems. whatever companies do not come here could end up going to europe or japan or china. we want them to maybe have their headquarters here in the bay area. >> is there one regional issue that elected officials across the region could focus on? if we are back here 12 months from now, i am able to ask you the question -- here is what you said 12 months ago and here is where we are now. is there one thing? >> i think it will be transportation. we have to make that infrastructure investment. we have to get our federal and state government more aligned. i know jerry is a big fan of our high speed rail, but we have to turn the corner on that. for us, in san francisco, a third of our flights out of sfo is to los angeles. we cannot have the capacity for international flights. the whole secret behind
to do an rvi assessment and then the last one is the national institutes of technology they are a group of scientists and engineers who look at tragic events and remember them so that the legacy of what they learned on one project is transferred to another. >> i just may interrupt if you don't mind. i just want to be kog that scent and i know that there are 38 more slides. what is most important to us in this budget update is getting a sense of the costs of each of the aspects of the package. what is actually mandated? and in order to be, i guess, a safety act project? and the cost of each of those individual packages. >> okay. >> i think that we all understand what the project is, what the implications are and the number of people that may are may not come through. i am going to have a number of questions about that as we month forward, but for me personally that is the most important aspect of this presentation, what we are very concerned about is containing costs. >> okay. >> and we are going to get, we are going to be getting to that. >> i know that it is in the presentation. >> i a
make use of multiple hops in between the attacker end the victim. that kind of technology can make it very difficult to directly attributed attacks. it's easy to appear to be coming from any country on the slopes. other evidence excited in the report is more in terms of how software is written, what kind of language is used, is its expressively native english or is it a non-native english person who wrote the command sets. >> is this a case of the pot calling the kettle black? here we have people accusing china of cyber warfare or espionage. surely the western powers are up to this, too. >> yes, and i think there's a dividingt thick the fi line between warfare and espionage. we seemed be " willing to call .yber espionage cyber war along the lines of espionage in terms of finding intellectual property and the data systems and stealing information from one resource or another, whether that is for commercial gain in terms of intellectual of commercial organizations or spying on government-related activities. you asked to what extent is this the pot calling the kettle black. certainly
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,317 (some duplicates have been removed)